looking through the magnifying glass

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Top 10 Facts You May Not Know About Your Diet

Nourishing Our Children

10

Drum roll, please …

  1. Eggs are healthy: Eggs are nature’s perfect food, providing excellent protein, as well as the gamut of nutrients and important fatty acids that contribute to the health of the brain and nervous system. Americans had less heart disease when they ate more eggs. Egg substitutes cause rapid death in test animals. Chirs Masterjohn, PhD, teaches us about the Incredibly, Edible Egg.
  2. Butter is good for you: Butter contains many nutrients vital to growth and brain function. Butter has nourished healthy populations throughout the globe for thousands of years. Read more about why Butter is Better from the Weston A. Price Foundation.
  3. Saturated fats and cholesterol are vital for optimum health: Cholesterol helps babies and children develop a healthy brain and nervous system. Saturated fats provide integrity to the cell wall, promote the body’s use of essential fatty acids, enhance the immune system…

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This South African man did something amazing with his NekNomination

Wow

Metro

As the NekNomination drinking challenge spreads like wildfire, one South African has given the craze a new meaning.

NekNomination – which is known by various monikers and spellings in different regions – is a game in which a person is filmed downing their drink in one go, before nominating others to do the same on camera. Frequently, they nominate friends in other countries, which is how the fad has spread so quickly around the world.

Several people are reported to have lost their lives after taking part in the challenge, after consuming dangerous levels of alcohol and in some cases, performing reckless stunts after downing their drinks.

But Brent Lindeque, a young South African, decided to do something a bit different when he was nominated.

In his video ‘A South African NekNomination’, Brent is filmed driving and talking to the camera, thanking his friend for nominating him.

‘[The craze] originated…

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Link

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/dec/09/nobel-winner-boycott-science-journals

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/dec/09/nobel-winner-boycott-science-journals

Now who would have thought of that..Nobel laureates stand up against major-publishing group bullying!


Link

http://slowrobot.com/i/47348

http://slowrobot.com/i/47348

Yep…true Story


Link

Dr Who on Tesla Coils

Dr Who on Tesla Coils

This is just sooo cool!


Link

Tim Minchins Dark Side

Tim Minchins Dark Side

Just in case you’re still not inspired by all the stuff I post the last couple of days, or world itself for that matter, or if you’re having a bad day: let Tim Minchin inspire and entertain your peritoneum a bit. Cheers for giggles and good music


Microscopy Three – Microscopic vs. Macroscopy

An ant as imaged using a scanning electron mic...

An ant as imaged using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A big surprise in the woods at Crich ...

English: A big surprise in the woods at Crich Tramway Village A new attraction at Crich Tramway Village is the Woodland Walk & Sculpture Trail. Near the Wakebridge end of the trail is this giant wood ant. You probably wouldn’t want to come across this as dusk approaches! (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And here we are with part three on microscopy; what microscopic and macroscopic means.

Let’s have a look at that, and start right at the beginning. If you think about scientific terms, it’s always, and I mean always, a good idea to look into the ethymology of the term and/or thing you want to know more about. In this case, we are talking about micro and macro. Mikros is a greak word (for once not a latin one, but scientists tend to switch between those two languages a lot), that means small. Makros on the other hand descirbes something big. Now this sounds very simplistic and not at all like something, that could be used as a definition; in the end a mouse is small too, but you wouldn’t need a microscope to see one. However, in a still simplistic view, the microcosm, that you would observe with a microscope, is that part of our world, that you wouldn’t be able to see without one. As opposed to the macrocosm, which you can. Thinking of that things start to come together a bit more. But I, myself, am still not quite satisfied with that definition either. What other properties could there be to nail it down a bit more proper.

In order to do so, we shall investigate three items, and their properties, a bit more closely; a binocular, a microscope and a magnifying glass.

A microscope will make something small, and close, within a narrow focus plane appear larger then it acutally is. A binocular on the other hand, will make something far away, typically bigger, almost without concerning about a foual plane (the focal plane at some point is basically infinite) appear smaller then it actually is. We only rearrange that image in our brain back to it’s expected size. And finally the magnifying glass would basically do both things, but it would turn blurry or upside down. How is this possible?

The answer lies within what is called focal length/width (and a subsequent arrangement of more lenses for further adjustment)

Now this is a very much complex topic, and I will leave you with this little teaser until my next post, where I’ll explain focal distance.


Deep Vascular Imaging in Wounds

Here you’ll see a really nice example of what modern microscopy actually allows you to do if combined with additional, fitting, techniques

Doctor & Surgeon

When we’re wounded, our bodies rush to repair the damage. First, there’s a blood clot that forms quickly and acts as a temporary seal. Then follows the more gradual process of angiogenesis – the growth of new blood vessels to replace those that are injured. This image is of a wound healing on a mouse. It was captured using a new form of fluorescence microscopy, which involves staining the tissue with chemicals that make it fluoresce, and then taking a picture that shows only the fluorescence. At the top is the blood clot in the open wound, while the strands beneath are newly grown capillaries [the smallest blood vessels] extending into the muscle. This technique enables us to understand the complex mechanisms of wound healing better than ever before.

Abstract

Deep imaging within tissue (over 300 μm) at micrometer resolution has become possible with the advent of…

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Microscopy Two – History of the lens

Philately, Magnifying glass shows the magnifie...

Philately, Magnifying glass shows the magnified image of the Deutsche Post 1 Reichsmark postage stamp issued on May 12 1946. Français : Étude à la loupe d’un timbre de la poste allemande de 1 Reichsmark datant du 12 mai 1946. Philatélie, loupe. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So here’s another short one for the microscopy series. The “what was before” the microscope part of it, if you want to phrase it that way.

The central part of a microscope is the lens. But a lens is also a plant (Lens culinaris) and the name of it’s very own fruit, called Lentia in latin. So how do these two connect, you might ask. And that is really straight forward. In the 1st century AD the romans started experimenting with various shapes of glass, not only to put them in windows but also convert them into beautiful pieces of artwork and jewlery for example. One of the shapes the cam up with resembled that of a lens, a common edible at that time. So it was roundish, flat at the edges and growing in thickness towards the center with a rather regular curvature. When those romans looked through that see-through, lens shaped obejct they discouvered that objects on the far side of it will appear bigger, and that was the very moment in history the magnifying glass, or lens, was born.

Without a lens, no microscope, no telescope, no binocular, in fact not even normal glasses would work. So I guess once again we have to be thankful for those great inventions that date back over centuries, without which our society would just not quite work as it does.

So now that you know where the lens comes from, my next post will focus a bit more on some of the other things I just mentioned. Namely binoculars, telescopes, magnifying glasses, regular glasses and what seperates them from what we consider a microscope.


Traveling Iceland with Google Glass + WordPress

Want to have GoggleGlass!!! Also it’s a pretty nice idea to link activities and make blogging easier

Silica Labs Through Glass

I just got back from about 12 days in Iceland. It was my vacation, so my girlfriend and I went armed with cameras.

I was taking pictures with a Nikon, an iPhone, and also with Google Glass.

My friends at Silica Labs built a really cool tool using WordPress.com’s open API to post photos directly from Glass to this WordPress.com blog.

As a result, I could tell the story of our Icelandic vacation by automatically sharing images from Glass.

Let me provide some guidance on the Glass images we posted here.

During the trip we:

  • walked on a glacier
  • watched whales near the Arctic Circle
  • hiked through a dried lava field
  • visited remote fjords (long blue inlets cutting sharply into wild mountains)
  • popped into hot pools of all kind (including a geothermal stream hours from civilization),
  • and came across hundreds of sheep and dozens of cows.

We also ate a lot…

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